Photo Journal: Mongolia

What comes to mind when you think of Mongolia?  For me, vast grassland and horses.

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Erdene Zuu Monastery in Karakorum

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108 stupas surrounding the grounds of the monastery.
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People going for their blessing.

 

Nomadic families enjoy a simple and minimalistic life – owning only the basic necessities, no iPads and video games to entertain themselves.

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A simple game that brought so much fun and laughter.
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This game is played with sheep’s knucklebone, that have been cleaned and polished.

 

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The children of the nomadic family were very friendly and outgoing.  The eldest daughter made sure we were entertained.
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It is nice to see children out playing instead of sitting in front of a screen.

 

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The children riding their bikes after dinner.  They went far out into the grassland.  One hour later, the girl was carried back in a motorcyle with her bike strapped in the back. She was too tired to bike back so she had her uncle who was out there gathering his herd to give her a lift back.
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Artists at work

 

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Nomadic families move around every three or four months as the weather changes.  It takes them about 30 minutes to put up a ger.   There are always 81 rods used to hold it up.  Why 81?   The number 3 is a sacred number.  3×3=9, 9×9=81.  Don’t walk between those two big poles in the middle of the yurt, as it is like separating the husband and wife of the family.
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The yurt gives the feeling of strength, warmth and security.  It is well insulated with sheep’s wool, keeping you warm and cosy in the winter time as well as cool in the blazing heat of summer.  There is an opening on the roof that brings plenty of sunlight in.  When it rains, you can pull down the plastic covering over the roof.
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You are always given a drink and a sweet when you enter someone’s home.  Guests should not refuse the offer.  Accept the drink with two hands.  It is polite to take a sip of the drink before putting it down.
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Our host preparing our dinner.

 

 

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Our mini-van. It is Mongolian superstition never to ask the driver what time you will reach your destination as they believe that is bad luck and will bring accidents.

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Author: Pearl

I have always loved traveling but did not venture out on my own until I was in my mid-20s. After my first solo adventure to Vietnam, I have fallen in love with the freedom and exhilaration of traveling alone.

I would like to use this blog to document my travels and record memorable stories I do not want to forget. It will be a platform to share useful information and hear about others’ experiences and thoughts, not necessarily about travels but also on life in general.

Live a simple and meaningful life, enjoy learning along the way, travel the world and explore the unknown!

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